Policies
We're All Secret Police E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

The Justice Department has a new role planned for the men and women of American law enforcement. Under proposed changes to the very fabric of American life from the U.S. Department of Justice, "police officers" and "secret police," will become synonymous. Making local police officers into spies is a remarkable suggestion. But even more incredible is the fact that the proposal has drawn so little attention.

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Nice Save, Boss E-mail
Written by Jose Torres   

For the most part, city police chiefs are not directly involved in the hands-on part of public safety.  But, like how to ride a bike or reciting Miranda rights, there are some things you never forget from your days on patrol.  Recently in Anaheim, CA three window-washers were left hanging off the side of an office building when their basket came free of its’ moorings.  Clinging to anything they could hold on to, all they could do was pray and wait for police and fire to arrive and rescue them.

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Foreclosures and Crime E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

As the US Congress continues to sputter and stall over legislation designed to keep more Americans from losing their homes, police around the country are already dealing with foreclosure-related crime. In some cases where the sub-prime mortgage meltdown has been particularly bad, agencies have assigned individual officers to work exclusively on crimes related to the empty houses with the big “public auction” sign out front.

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Weapons access tied to fitness E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

While it’s true that cops are losing their jobs, public sector  pensions and benefits are under attack and law enforcement agencies are continuing to struggle to get new hires and keep the officers they already have, many police leaders have decided that there is a more important issue to focus on. And that topic is fitness. While not everyone has gone as far as the L.A. County Sheriff’s Dept. – they recently hired a full-time dietician to help the rank and file drop pounds – some top cops have decided on the “carrot and stick” approach.

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Should reserves have regular training? E-mail
Written by APB staff   

Everyone is aware of the fact that money is tight at every level these days. That being the case, public safety professionals can use all the help they can get. Volunteer officers have been a valuable resource for agencies struggling to provide communities with adequate police protection. But what about liability issues related to volunteers’ training? In Tennessee police recruits get 400 hours of rigorous training before they hit the street.

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Maybe those in charge should do the testifying E-mail
Written by Edwin Day   

I would like to comment on the ongoing saga of the Sean Bell issue, specifically the dynamics surrounding the crticisms that have been raised about the handling of the crime scene. Towards the tail end of my career, we had increasing incidents of uniformed bosses who came to the scene and thought they had years of investigative experience. Frankly, the less street experience they had, the more proficient at investigations they thought they were.

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School shootings change campus police policy E-mail
Written by APB Staff   

A Connecticut commission has ruled that Yale University must provide access to campus police personnel records. The ruling is just one of several in the last few months that are requiring private universities to open up their records to the public. While Yale University officers are armed and make arrests, they work for a private university, institutions which have been reluctant to share their records with the media and the public.

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Splitting Hairs over drug testing E-mail
Written by Ronald MacGillivray   
In our last contract it was agreed that three samples would have to be collected for our annual random drug/hair sample test. The bargaining committee got the department to agree to give any officer an additional test who had tested positive.
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State police sue sheriff for records E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   
In an unprecedented action, the Michigan State Police is suing the Oakland County Sheriff's Office to find out why it took deputies so long to respond to the scene of a shooting. The incident started when local residents reported to authorities that they heard a man and a woman, both shot and bleeding on the ground, crying for help. Eventually Ferndale police escorted an EMS crew into the area, but the incident prompted headlines, interest from the governor's office and an unusual lawsuit assigned to Ingham Circuit Judge William Collette.
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