Lieutenants Get Raise E-mail
Written by NYPD, LBA   

The NYPD's Lieutenants Benevolent Association (LBA) has a tentative collective bargaining agreement covering Sept. 1, 2007 through Oct. 31, 2009. Over 1,600 lieutenants will be getting a compounded wage increase of 8.16 over the life of the agreement. The deal follows closely on the heels of the six-year, 27.5-percent-pay-hike contract for the sergeants union. Newly promoted lieutenants will get two extra paid days off and after each step in the schedule they will earn a $1,000 raise. Top-earning NYPD lieutenants will now get $119,606, not including overtime.

Union wants former contract complied with Buffalo police officers would receive 3.4 percent raises under a plan Mayor Byron W. Brown will submit to the control board. Right now most officers are at top pay scale, and their salaries would increase by $1,971, to $59,949. But Buffalo PBA President Robert Meegan said that until the city honors the terms of a 2003 contract, he doubts officers will ratify a new agreement. The earlier contract awarded officers annual 3.4 percent raises in return for agreeing to major concessions, including one-person patrols. Officers received $5,000 across-the-board raises and the first 3.4 percent increase. But they never received three subsequent raises that totaled 10.2 percent, and the union argues these increases should be retroactive. Meegan has said if the city doesn't honor the 2003 pact, he thinks an arbitrator will have to impose a new contract. Brown hopes to avoid such an outcome.

Three-year contract approved

Officers in Seaside, California will finally be getting a three-year contract and a raise after two years of no or minimal salary increases. City officials are hoping the pact will bring the salaries into line with other departments in the area. For several years the pay for Seaside officers has been substantially lower than neighboring agencies. The increases include a Cost of Living Adjustment (COLA) and an equity adjustment based on a salary survey completed in May. All employees covered by the agreements will receive a cost of living adjustment and employees in positions with compensation ranges that are below market will also receive an equity adjustment. Over the term of the three years, officers will receive the following: Effective July 1, 2007: 12.34% (4% COLA and 8.34% equity); effective July 1, 2008: 8.17% (4% COLA and 4.17% equity); effective July 1, 2009: 8.17%

Cops get 8% over three years

In Methuen, Mass. the City Council unanimously approved spending $341,180 to give raises to the 63 patrolmen, 23 supervisors and nine dispatchers in the Police Department. The raises are part of a new three-year contract each of the three police unions signed with Mayor William Manzi. The council approved the contracts but according to people who were there there was little discussion about the pending federal investigation into police grant spending and the recent demand for repayment of $170,000 in grant money. The U.S. Justice Department has ordered the city to pay back $170,000 in federal grant money. The Justice Department said police can't sufficiently account for overtime payments through the Weed and Seed grant. The city has appealed and Police Chief Joseph Solomon has assured the community that the department can account for grant spending.

Officials hope raise will stop deputies from quitting

Fighting back against a surge of deputies heading to the Santa Fe Police Department, the Santa Fe County Sheriff's Department is giving their deputies a raise. Both departments are battling officer shortages. The Santa Fe P.D. responded by giving their new recruits a pay raise and a $5,000 bonus. Recently six Santa Fe County deputies, eager for the increased pay, transferred over to the police department. To help stem the leak, Sheriff Greg Solano rushed through $700,000 in raises, bringing deputies' pay in line with Santa Fe police officers.

Information for this column comes from Policepay.net. Policepay.net President Ron York has written a useful, informative book entitled, The Police Negotiator's Handbook. You can order it on their website.


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