Officer Down
Tribute to Charlie Wassil: a cop who made a difference E-mail
Written by Leo Dylewski Peekskill, New York Police Dept.   

Police week is here again. It is the time of year when officers are acknowledged and recognized for their hard work and dedication. We do this job because we love it. We love the feeling of accomplishment as we are able to help a person in need and make their day a bit better. We never think twice about running towards danger and assist others. Sometimes the price we pay for these selfless acts don’t show up right away, they wait and appear years later as what happened to my co-worker, mentor and friend Charlie Wassil.

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Reflections on 9/11 E-mail
Written by Craig Floyd   

Like everyone else, I cannot help but recall some of the powerful memories of that horrific day – September 11, 2001. Many of the memories are good ones – the amazing acts of heroism, the patriotism that was ignited when the towers fell, the public's outpouring of support for our public safety officers, just to name a few. But none of us will ever think of  9/11 without remembering the thousands of lives that were lost, the pain and grief of the survivors, and the physical and emotional trauma experienced by the rescuers.

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A Daughter Saved, A Hero Lost E-mail
On the evening of April 26, 2011, Wade Sharp pulled into a campground in Choctaw County, Mississippi with his 9-year-old daughter Bailey by his side. They began what was to be a special week of father/daughter time, camping and hiking through the Natchez Trace.

They pitched a tent, built a campfire, and spent the evening roasting marshmallows together. The good times had barely begun. But in the early morning hours, a violent thunderstorm and high winds ripped through the campground, knocking down trees and scattering tents.

As Wade instinctively covered his daughter with his body to shield her from the storm, a large tree crashed down through their tent, killing him instantly. Remarkably, Bailey was unharmed and was brought to safety by neighboring campers. In a split second, a father had unselfishly given his life to save his daughter.

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The deadly threat of the sovereign citizen for all public safety workers E-mail
Written by APB Staff   

If you look up the definition of "terrorist," the dictionary says a terrorist is "a radical who employs terror as a political weapon; usually organizes with other terrorists in small cells; often uses religion as a cover for terrorist activities."

That describes Jerry Kane perfectly. If you haven't heard of Jerry Kane, he's a cop-killing so-called "sovereign citizen."

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A Cowardly Attack On An Officer E-mail
In Florida recently, a cop was so brutally attacked after a traffic stop that responding units and EMTs were sure that Officer Carlos Castillo had been shot.

The Miami-Dade Police detective was struck in the head with a cinder block, beaten, and then run over with his own car after a routine traffic stop.

Castillo was rushed to Ryder Trauma Center, where the 37-year-old married father of two was still in critical condition at the time this was written. Castillo suffered multiple skull fractures and brain and spine injuries, as well as seven broken ribs and extensive damage to several internal organs.

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116 FALLEN HEROES REMEBERED FROM 2009 E-mail
Written by Craig W. Floyd   

Around 7:45 p.m. on the evening of June 7, 2009, Nazareth (PA) police received a report of a 31-year-old man with a gun violating a protection from abuse order.  The man, who was involved in an ugly custody battle with his wife, kidnapped his nine-year-old son at gunpoint and led police on a 40-mile high speed chase.
Pennsylvania State Troopers Joshua Miller and Robert Lombardo chased down the suspect and the pursuit abruptly ended when Trooper Miller used the PIT maneuver to stop the vehicle.  Concerned for the safety of the child, the two troopers approached the vehicle and began to shatter the driver's side window when the suspect opened fire striking both Troopers Miller and Lombardo.

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SUPREME SACRIFICE E-mail
Written by Craig W. Floyd   

New York City Police Detectives Rodney J. Andrews and James V. Nemorin worked in the elite 23-member Firearms Investigation Unit of the Narcotics Division. According to one of their colleagues, “Our job is to get guns off the streets before they are used to commit a crime or kill someone.” They work undercover and often deal with cold-blooded street thugs who would think nothing of killing a cop. A veteran of the all-volunteer unit put it this way, “In this job you’re pretty much bait, and I know that a big fish could come along and eat me any time.” The worst of those fears came true on the night of March 10, 2003.

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Multiple LE killings were up in 2009 E-mail
Written by Craig W. Floyd   

This past year has been punctuated by intense bursts of violence against our nation’s peace officers.  Fifteen law enforcement officers have been shot to death over the last 12 months in just five separate multiple-death incidents. The most recent of these heinous acts occurred just after 8 AM. on Sunday, November 29, when a lone gunman walked into a Pierce County, Washington coffee shop and opened fire on four officers from the Lakewood (WA) Police Department who were going over plans for their upcoming shift.  The four officers killed that day were Sergeant Mark Renninger and Officers Tina Griswold, Ronald Owens, and Greg Richards. None of the other civilians in the coffee shop were targeted or injured.

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Stabbed Cop Mounts Amazing Recovery E-mail
On the evening of January 15, just hours after a pilot "landed" U.S. Airways Flight 1549 in the Hudson River, NYPD Sgt. Timothy Smith of the 101 Precinct in Queens responded to a seemingly routine job regarding an emotionally disturbed person (EDP). The police had been summoned to the location by the EDP's wife, who grew concerned when he started babbling incoherently while chopping vegetables with a knife. Armed with a non-lethal Taser gun, Sgt. Smith, an 11-year department veteran, knocked on the bedroom door where the EDP had sequestered himself.
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Fewer deaths provide no comfort E-mail
Written by Craig Floyd   

According to Mike Prosperi, owner of the Imo’s Pizza near City Hall, everyone in Kirkwood (MO) knew Charles Lee “Cookie” Thornton.  “He always had a smile on his face,” according to Mr. Prosperi, and “he was always saying, ‘God bless you.’” But there was another side to Thornton.  He was a regular presence at City Council meetings and he was not there to listen quietly. A newspaper correspondent, Janet McNichols, who covered those Council meetings, said Thornton would “come to the meeting and he’d have a big easel and a picture of a donkey on there and call the Council asses.”

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In Their Time of Greatest Need E-mail

When a police officer dies in the line of duty, shouldn't the individuals and the badge they wear receive the proper respect?  If the officers and their grieving families were to be forgotten, that would only make the hurt more painful. Unfortunately, many police agencies do not have the resources to undertake large-scale official funerals.

Since the state of Missouri was established in 1821, it has suffered more than 620 line-of-duty deaths, many of them in recent years. When two policemen were murdered in the suburban St. Louis community of Kirkwood on February 7, 2008, a group of officers came together to begin creating the Missouri Law Enforcement Funeral Assistance Team.

Over the last year, these officers have devoted hundreds of hours to research and to planning this new organization.  They have assembled a Missouri-specific law enforcement funeral guide, have put in place a structure to establish funeral response teams, and have developed training criteria for volunteers who will assist police departments and officers' families through the aftermath of a line-of-duty death.

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