September Letters to the Editor E-mail

Words of wisdom we never heard

Remember the guy who got on a plane with a bomb built into his shoe and tried to light it? Did you know his trial is over? Did you know he was sentenced? Did you see or hear any of the judge's comments on TV or Radio? Didn't think so. Everyone should hear what Judge William Young of the US District Court had to say. Prior to sentencing, the Judge asked the defendant if he had anything to say. After admitting his guilt to the court for the record, Reid also admitted his allegiance to Osama bin Laden, to Islam, and to the religion of Allah, defiantly stating, "I think I will not apologize for my actions." He told the court "I am at war with your country." Judge Young then delivered the following statement:

"Mr. Richard C. Reid, hearken now to the sentence the Court imposes upon you. On counts 1, 5 and 6 the Court sentences you to life in prison in the custody of the United States Attorney General.  On counts 2, 3, 4and 7, the Court sentences you to 20 years in prison on each count, the sentence on each count to run consecutively.  (That's 80 years.) On count 8 the Court sentences you to the mandatory 30 years again, to be served consecutively to the 80 years just imposed.  The Court imposes upon you for each of the eight counts a fine of $250,000 that's an aggregate fine of $2 million.

The Court accepts the government's recommendation with respect to restitution and orders restitution in the amount of $298.17 to Andre Bousquet and $5,784 to American Airlines. The Court imposes upon you an $800 special assessment. The Court imposes upon you five years supervised release simply because the law requires it. But the life sentences are real life sentences so I need go no further.

This is the sentence that is provided for by our statutes.  It is a fair and just sentence.  It is a righteous sentence. Now, let me explain this to you.  We are not afraid of you or any of your terrorist co-conspirators, Mr. Reid.  We are Americans.  We have been through the fire before.  There is too much war talk here and I say that to everyone with the utmost respect.  Here in this court, we deal with individuals as individuals and care for individuals as individuals. As human beings, we reach out for justice. You are not an enemy combatant. You are a terrorist. You are not a soldier in any war. You are a terrorist.

To give you that reference, to call you a soldier, gives you far too much stature. Whether the officers of government do it or your attorney does it, or if you think you are a soldier, you are not-you are a terrorist.  And we do not negotiate with terrorists.  We do not meet with terrorists.  We do not sign documents with terrorists.  We hunt them down one by one and bring them to justice. So war talk is way out of line in this court.  You are a big fellow. But you are not that big.  You're no warrior.  I've known warriors. You are a terrorist.

A species of criminal that is guilty of multiple attempted murders.  In a very real sense, State Trooper Santiago had it right when you first were taken off that plane and into custody and you wondered where the press and the TV crews were, and he said: 'You're no big deal.' You are no big deal. What your able counsel and what the equally able United States attorneys have grappled with and what I have as honestly as I know how tried to grapple with, is why you did something so horrific.  What was it that led you here to this courtroom today?

I have listened respectfully to what you have to say. And I ask you to search your heart and ask yourself what sort of unfathomable hate led you to do what you are guilty and admit you are guilty of doing?  And, I have an answer for you.  It may not satisfy you, but as I search this entire record, it comes as close to understanding as I know. It seems to me you hate the one thing that to us is most precious.

You hate our freedom.  Our individual freedom.  Our individual freedom to live as we choose, to come and go as we choose, to believe or not believe as we individually choose.  Here, in this society, the very wind carries freedom.  It carries it everywhere from sea to shining sea.  It is because we prize individual freedom so much that you are here in this beautiful courtroom, so that everyone can see, truly see, that justice is administered fairly, individually, and discretely.  It is for freedom's sake that your lawyers are striving so vigorously on your behalf, have filed appeals, will go on in their representation of you before other judges.

We Americans are all about freedom. Because we all know that the way we treat you, Mr. Reid, is the measure of our own liberties.  Make no mistake though.  It is yet true that we will bear any burden; pay any price, to preserve our freedoms.  Look around this courtroom.  Mark it well.  The world is not going to long remember what you or I say here.

The day after tomorrow, it will be forgotten, but this, however, will long endure. Here in this courtroom and courtrooms all across America, the American people will gather to see that justice, individual justice, justice, not war, individual justice is in fact being done.  The very President of the United States through his officers will have to come into courtrooms and lay out evidence on which specific matters can be judged and juries of citizens will gather to sit and judge that evidence democratically, to mold and shape and refine our sense of justice. See that flag, Mr. Reid?  That's the flag of the United States of America .

That flag will fly there long after this is all forgotten. That flag stands for freedom.  And it always will. Mr. Custody Officer.  Stand him down. So, how much of this Judge's comments did we hear on our TV sets?

We need more judges like Judge Young. Everyone should and needs to hear what this fine judge had to say. These are powerful words that strike home- sent in by Anonymous

The origin of Taps

To me, nothing could more eloquent or more moving than a lone bugler blowing Taps. I was not aware of the history of Taps which someone sent me. I thought American Police Beat readers would enjoy hearing the story as much as I did. It all began in 1862 during the Civil War, when Union Army Captain Robert Elli was with his men near Harrison's Landing in  Virginia.

The Confederate Army was on the other side of the narrow strip of land. During the night, Captain Elli heard the moans of a soldier who lay severely wounded on the field.  Not knowing if it was a   Union  or Confederate soldier, the Captain decided to risk his life and bring the stricken man back for medical attention. Crawling on his stomach through the gunfire, the Captain reached the stricken soldier and began pulling him toward his encampment..

When the Captain finally reached his own lines, he discovered it was actually a Confederate soldier, but the soldier was dead. The Captain lit a lantern and suddenly caught his breath and went numb with shock.  In the dim light, he saw the face of the soldier. It was his own son. The boy had been studying music in the South when the war broke out..

Without telling his father, the boy enlisted in the Confederate Army. The following morning, heartbroken, the father asked permission of his superiors to give his son a full military burial, despite his enemy status. His request was only partially granted. The Captain had asked if he could have a group of Army band members play a funeral dirge for his son at the funeral. The request was turned down since the soldier was a Confederate.

But, out of respect for the father, they did say they could give him only one musician. The Captain chose a bugler.  He asked the bugler to play a series of musical notes he had found on a piece of paper in the pocket of the dead youth's uniform. This wish was granted. The haunting melody, we now know as 'Taps' used at military funerals was born. The words are:

Day is done. Gone the sun. From the lakes From the hills. From the sky.

All is well. Safely rest. God is nigh.

Fading light. Dims the sight. And a star. Gems the sky.

Gleaming bright. From afar. Drawing nigh. Falls the night.

Thanks and praise.

For our days.

Neath the sun Neath the stars.

Neath the sky As we go.

This we know.

God is nigh

I too have felt the chills while listening to "Taps" but I have never seen all the words to the song until now. I didn't even know there was more than one verse.  I also never knew the story behind the song and I didn't know if you had either so I thought I'd pass it along. I now have an even deeper respect for the song than I did before.

9th anniversary of 9/11

It is almost nine years since the attacks of September 11, 2001.

I wanted to send this poem in to share with your readers. I wrote it right after the attacks.

-Sgt. Lisa Midwood, NYPD

Before the attack when they stood as two, each edifice stretched high soaring into the blue.

Upon the assault of each tower in the early morning hour, the lives of many came to a half by terrorist fault.

In the din, as each collapsed to the ground prayers were heard for love ones to be found and every American hero that perished at Ground Zero.

The calamity of crumbled metal and twisted steel made it all so terribly real.

Our flag waved endlessly amongst the pile as the sigh and smell of the inferno reeked, mile upon mile.

By the pledge, the city will carry on, volunteers worked above and beyond.

With all hope to find a survivor in each passing hour digging continued with sweat and pride by every creed, color and hide.

The evil deed done by Osama bin Laden would not get our pardon.

He tried to crush our spirit and make us weak.

Instead we stand united unwilling to break our peak.

We will flourish anew as a blooming flower and in the end, remain in supreme power.


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