Featured Articles
County tries to stiff public safety on pensions E-mail
Written by Cynthia Brown   

Orange County's effort to get out of its contractual pension agreement with its deputies is quickly becoming a money pit. The county has already paid more than half a million dollars to four law firms in just the last year to research and develop a strategy for a legal challenge. And that's before supervisors have even decided to take the case to court. The hours billed by attorneys and the number of firms involved indicate the county's extraordinary effort to nullify its own labor pact.

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Steroids, beer and hookers - welcome to prison E-mail
Written by APB Staff   

According to a recent report on CNN, the correctional system of the state of Florida can be characterized largely by softball games, kickbacks and drunken orgies. That’s what Florida’s former prison secretary says he inherited when he took over one of the nation’s largest prison systems just two years ago. The CNN report featured images of “the house,” a building on prison grounds where prison officials allegedly held orgies.

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My shift is over, good luck E-mail
Written by APB Staff   

They are called “clock-watchers” – those individuals who say that when their shift is over, their shift is over. Period. Thankfully, most clock-watchers do not make a living driving buses. A bus driver who was dead serious about her work rules very seriously abandoned a bus full of former prisoners along a highway because her hours for the day were over.

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Need help with homicides? E-mail
Written by APB Staff   

A new reality television series, “Homicide Task Force,” is about to hit the airways. The show was the brainchild of four people, including Ray Peavy, who just retired from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Dept. where he commanded the Homicide Unit for over a decade. Captain Peavy has brought together a core group of recently retired homicide detectives from the Sheriff’s Department to work on the project. Working with homicide investigators from local agencies, the team will take a fresh look at unsolved or troublesome cases in hopes they can finally be cleared.

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Residency rule changes E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

As law enforcement agencies continue to struggle to fill their ranks with officers, some organizations are changing the rules in the hopes of finding more bodies. For the first time in more than 50 years, the Philadelphia Police Department will be allowed to search for recruits outside the city limits.

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Is cell phone GPS good enough for a conviction? E-mail
Written by APB staff   
In an interesting case coming out of Minnesota, lawyers for a man arrested for helping get illegal immigrants into the U.S. by arranging phony marriages said that data from a location tap of their client’s T-Mobile phone should not be used against him in court because there was no evidence of criminal activity (i.e. probable cause) and that cell phone tracking technology is not that precise.
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Establishing trust is his specialty E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   
Residents of Arab-American and Muslim communities in the U.S. aren’t necessarily the most enthusiastic group when it comes to interacting with local law enforcement officers. Many of these people come from countries where the police aren’t agents of public safety but rather extensions of oppressive governments. The question is how to change that perception, and the Anaheim Police Department has an answer – Officer Omar Adham.
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Court sides with cops on pensions E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   
The city of Lexington, Kentucky might have to fork over more than $30 million to shore up its pension fund for police officers and firefighters. According to a recent article in the Herald Leader newspaper by Beth Musgrave, the state Court of Appeals sided with five police officers who sued the Urban County Government, saying the city has underfunded the police and fire pension fund.
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Slain Trooper's widow files lawsuit E-mail
Written by APB staff   
The widow of a New York State trooper  who was gunned down in a shootout last year announced that she  plans to sue St. Lawrence County for $100 million. Barbara Brinkerhoff and her infant daughter Isabella are claiming that the 29-year-old husband and father was killed due to the negligence of the probation department. Barbara Brinkeroff says that county officials failed to properly handle a warrant that could have led to a fugitive gunman's arrest months before her husbandwas killed by the suspect.
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Shootings changing policies E-mail
Written by APB staff   
A Connecticut commission has ruled that Yale University must provide access to campus police personnel records. The ruling is just one of several in the last few months that are requiring private universities to open up their records to the public. While Yale University officers are armed and make arrests, they work for a private university, institutions which have been reluctant to share their records with the media and the public.
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Once bitten twice shy E-mail
Written by Vincent Schilling   
The human jaw and its powerful bite is an underestimated threat for those who protect and serve for a living. Master Officer Hans Schafer, who works out of the First Precinct in the City of Virginia Beach, received such an injury by an assailant during patrol in 2006. Schafer was working the 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. shift when he observed a vehicle speeding toward an intersection. The occupant noticed Schafer's patrol car and quickly attempted to stop.
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Useful tool or dirty pool- No confidence E-mail
Written by Ted Hunt   
Chiefs of police have one of the most difficult jobs in society. They must direct the city's crime prevention and control efforts and at the same time do their best to maintain the approval of major stakeholders, including the police association. But sometimes those relationships sour and the police association decides to air their grievances. One of the ways they do this is with so-called "votes of no-confidence."
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The King of Coffee E-mail
Written by APB staff   
Cops and coffee go together like peas and carrots, but there's a limit to how much caffeine the human body can handle. That is, unless you're a retired cop named Ron Shepherd. The 52-year-old armed forces veteran and ex-cop with an intimidating mustache is a legend in Lincoln, Nebraska. No one has ever seen a man drink 72 cups of coffee a day and live to tell the tale.
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The agent, the bribe and the database E-mail
Written by APB staff   
If you work with computers a lot, you're already intimately aware of the limitations of technology. Until that magic day when you get in your car and tell the computer, "drive me to work," these wonderful machines, in the end, are dependent on human beings to function properly. Unless you've been doing research at the North Pole for the last decade or so, you may have noticed that information sharing technology, particularly in the area of law enforcement, has become a booming industry.
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Cops face higher risk of heart attack E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   
Most public safety professionals are well aware of the risks they take in the street to serve and protect. But there are silent killers just as dangerous as a potentially armed suspect fleeing the scene. Stress is one of those silent killers. And according to a recent study from the United Kingdom, stressed workers under the age of 50 are two-thirds more likely to suffer from heart disease.
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UK cops march in outrage E-mail
Written by APB staff   
When cops in the UK were told that they would not be getting their meager 2.5 percent pay raise, they were beyond angry. Their disappointment and frustration erupted into the largest protest ever staged by law enforcement in Great Britain. Over 25,000 off-duty police officers took to the capital's streets – about one in six of the total number in the country – to deliver a stark message to Prime Minister Gordon Brown.
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Victims get victimized by cuts E-mail
Written by APB staff   
For the second straight year, money distributed to the states from the Justice Department's Crime Victims Fund will decline. As part of the recently passed omnibus-spending bill, Congress capped payouts from the fund at $590 million. That's $35 million less than was spent the year before. According to a recent article in the Baltimore Sun by Josh Mitchell, Maryland is expected to receive slightly more than $6 million for victim-assistance programs in the 12-month period that began in October.
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Tax dollars for contract killer E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   
There are certain ugly realities that even the most seasoned law enforcement professional struggles with. And it doesn't get much uglier than handing a serial killer a fat check upon his release from prison. When hit-man-turned-government-witness John Martorano strolled out of prison last year after serving only a dozen years for 20 murders, the federal government gave him $20,000 cash to help him start a new life.
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Stealing our history E-mail
Written by APB staff   
The problem with robbing a bank or a liquor store is that it's risky. How's the crook supposed to know if the guy behind him in line is an off-duty cop or if the clerk has a shotgun under the counter? But what if there was no one around for miles and your chances of getting caught were next to nothing? Well, welcome to the new frontier – looting historical and archaeological treasures from our national parks.
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Next level training E-mail
Written by Jim Gordon   

Ask any veteran officer and they will often tell you stories about their own academy experiences. Ask them what they look for in new recruits and they'll tell you discipline, discipline, discipline, as well as some common sense and the ability to make sensible decisions. There's been a long-standing debate on just how to train new cops. Some say our training should be along the same lines as military "boot camp" while others wonder what that really achieves for our new officers.

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When the NYPD calls 911 E-mail
Written by Cynthia Brown   
The call came in to the NYPD's Emergency Service Unit a little after 5PM on a weekday evening in April last year. A power failure had knocked out the tramway going between Manhattan and Roosevelt Island, disabling two tram cars. This left 70 passengers, including two infants, several children, and a disabled woman, dangling 250 feet above the East River and the streets of New York.
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