Featured Articles
Systems failures E-mail
Written by apb staff   

Back before $4 a gallon gasoline and the sub-prime mortgage crisis, there was not a lot of talk about the wisdom of buying untested computer solutions designed to expedite paperwork and streamline operations. But the dismal performance of the Mississippi Automated System Project has already cost taxpayers millions and some people are starting to ask some questions.

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Can't afford the real deal E-mail
Written by John Sacco   

There is a growing problem throughout the country with the use of private security guards protecting private property as well as state and federal facilities. Generally, the guards are overworked and under-paid. Security companies have to bid on contracts and the lowest bid gets the work. In order to show a decent profit, the low bid means a lower hourly wage for the security guard. People who accept this employment are usually college kids looking for some extra walking around money, retirees supplementing their income, recent arrivals to the U.S. with little language skills or no skills at all, and people who just need a job period.

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Parity broken and cops get a raise E-mail
Written by Cynthia Brown   

A state arbitration panel has awarded New York City patrol officers a ground-breaking contract giving them 4.5- and five-percent raises for the two-year period covering 2004 through 2006. Patrick J. Lynch, serving his third four-year term as New York City PBA president, told a meeting of the union’s delegates that there are “several historic components” to the award “that make it notable and that make it one that we can continue to build on.” Lynch pointed out that “for the third round (of contract negotiations) running, the PBA has produced the best outcome of any union in the city.

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Roker's reality show DEA E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

Why should local law enforcement officers get all the glory when it comes to reality television? Well, fear not Drug Enforcement Agency, Al Roker, (yeah, you read that right – Al Roker) is producing a new reality televsion series featuring the DEA in the Motor City. “DEA” is an original Spike TV series that follows U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agents in metro Detroit. The project, made up of six one-hour episodes, was filmed last summer.

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Public Safety's Perfect Storm E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

According to critics of the Bush Administration, the recent cuts at the federal level to law enforcement, particularly in the area of drug enforcement, are nothing short of perilous. Just one case involves the future of the Missouri River Drug Task Force, an anti-narcotics unit that includes ten police detectives from seven counties in southwestern Montana, which could depend on whether its officers can confiscate enough drug money to pay their own salaries.

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Little old ladies on hot seat E-mail
Written by APB staff   

There is nothing less frightening than two little old ladies driving down the street, unless their names are Olga Rutterschmidt and Helen Golay. These two septuagenarians are stone killers, according the Los Angeles County DA’s office. Not only do they stand accused of running an insurance con, the women preyed on the most defenseless members of their community – the homeless. Authorities allege that the defendants conspired to insure two indigent men, kill them in fake hit-and-run accidents and then collect on the insurance policies.

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The good, the bad and the ugly E-mail
Written by apb staff   

Lt. Randy Sutton’s 2004 book, True Blue: Police Stories by Those Who Have Lived Them, a collection of real-life police stories written by police officers themselves, was hailed by reviewers, readers, and police organizations around the country. Denis Hamill of the New York Daily News called it “a simply great new book,” while John Langley, creator of the television show COPS said “these pages bring to vivid reality the real stories of cops whose guts and glory are seldom seen and rarely heard.”

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Witnesses scared to give testimony E-mail
Written by APB staff   

Witnesses to killings and other violent crimes are refusing to cooperate in law enforcement investigations with such regularity that the phenomenon is driving down the rate of solved murders throughout the country. According to a recent article in USA Today by Kevin Johnson, police aren’t getting the kind of help they used to when it comes to violent crime.

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The 2009 Western States Police & Fire Games E-mail
Written by Mike Parker   

One of the largest multi-sport athletic events in the world is coming to L.A. County. From June 13 through June 20, 2009, law enforcement and fire service employees primarily from 14 states, as well as other states in the U.S., will compete for medals and bragging rights at the 2009 Western States Police & Fire Games (WSPFG). The games are held every year in the western U.S. and attract over 5,000 competitors for the 60 or so events ranging from angling to wrestling.

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Cops helping cops through tough times E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

How anyone can ask, “Why are police officers leaving public service for private jobs?” with a straight face is hard to imagine. The job that once guaranteed steady work, measly pay, a secure pension and an opportunity to help one’s fellow man makes no such promises these days. If you want to know how far down the totem pole cops have fallen, consider the situation in McCurtain, Oklahoma. The cops are wearing hand-me-downs from other cops.

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Parole changes could lead to cuts E-mail
Written by APB staff   

Law enforcement officials in California say that plans to shrink the state’s $14.5 billion budget deficit by shifting responsibility for monitoring parolees from the state to counties could lead to sharp cuts in police funding. “It would result in a loss of officers, possibly a hiring freeze,” Stockton Officer Pete Smith, a department spokesman, told Christian Burkin of the Record newspaper in a recent interview.

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I need your cruiser! E-mail
Written by APB Staff   

In Gary, Indiana, a man who told police he feared gang members were chasing him stole a squad car and led police on a chase. Danny Ware, 39, of Winkelman, Arizona was arrested on preliminary charges of auto theft, fleeing, resisting law enforcement, driving with a suspended license and criminal mischief.

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One in three fugitives missing from database E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

The main problem with criminal databases is the fact that they’re only as good as the information they contain. Unfortunately, the national fugitive database doesn’t include information on a full third of those individuals being sought by authorities on felony warrants. Federal lawmakers and advocacy groups are calling for new laws and more funding from the Federal government to close gaps in a criminal justice system that allows hundreds of thousands of felony fugitives to roam free.

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Desk cops to hit the street, civilian influx E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

According to a recent report by City Controller Laura Chick, some 400 Los Angeles police officers now assigned to administrative tasks and other desk jobs should be patrolling the streets in order to bolster the city’s understaffed police force. The 203-page study hasn’t changed plans by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and Police Chief William J. Bratton to continue their aggressive push to hire 1,000 officers by 2010 despite a severe budget deficit.

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Sheriff tells media to leave him alone E-mail
Written by APB Staff   

It’s always tricky when the boss’s kid has too much to drink and gets arrested. It’s even more complicated when the local media writes an article in the newspaper about the incident. But it gets really hairy when the chief of police threatens to arrest reporters for “interfering” in his business. When the Duval County Sheriff Santiago Barrera Jr. made that very threat recently, no one took it lightly. That’s mainly because Barrera Jr. has been doing things his own way in Texas for the last 20 years.

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Terrified of the Chief E-mail
Written by APB Staff   

In Arkansas, Bryant firefighters are living in fear. But it’s not smoke or flames that has the guys losing sleep, it’s the fact that their boss is angry, armed, and extremely unpopular with the department.

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F.O.P. says price too high for pay raises E-mail
Written by APB Staff   

If you want to understand how crafty the forces are that want to undo collective bargaining for the cops that have it, consider the following headline: “FOP against bill that would give officers annual raises.” Huh? Isn’t the Fraternal Order of Police all about getting their members a better deal at the bargaining table? Why on Earth would a police association be against a raise for police officers?

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Detection exercise fizzles E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

There are essentially two schools of thought on preventing acts of terrorism. There are techies, the folks who say all you need is the right equipment, software and the money to buy them. Then there are the human intelligence advocates, those that say a good tip from a credible source is worth hundreds of hand-held radiation detectors. Luckily for the residents of New York City, the NYPD and Commissioner Ray Kelly believe that a combination of old-time police work and the use of new equipment and technology is the best way to protect New York’s nine million residents.

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Stop paying off people who sue police E-mail
Written by Pete Simpson   

It’s 2008 and the Portland Police Bureau is getting sued, which is not exactly breaking news. The latest lawsuit was filed by a man who claims racial bias is the reason he was stopped and searched by Portland Police officers. Compelling argument, right? Heard it all before, right? Maybe not this one. First, the short story on the stop. The 40-year-old man, who happens to be African-American, was contacted by officers who engaged him in mere conversation.

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Upgrades boost morale E-mail
Written by APB staff   

There were some happy officers at the Weehawken Police Department when they returned to work last month after a long weekend. Awaiting them was a new police headquarters – a $650,000 upgrade that included a new bulletproof, sealed front desk area, a new radio system, 14 new computers with a new server, a new locker room and bathroom area, just to name a few.

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Whistle-blower gets some vindication E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

In Washington D.C., for the last seven or eight years, there has been an unspoken rule about keeping your mouth shut if you depend on a federal paycheck. Several U.S. attorneys, a former F.B.I. agent named Colleen Rowley and former U.S. Park Police Chief Theresa Chambers can tell you what happened to them after they spoke out about issues in a way that didn’t please the administration.

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