Featured Articles
Lords of discipline E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

There is a wide array of schools of thought regarding the best way to run a law enforcement agency particularly when it comes to the issue of discipline. Some bosses are heavier on the stick than the carrot and vice-versa. But at the end of the day it’s up to the top-cop in terms of the best way to manage his or her agency.

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DOJ slams sheriff's office E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

A two-year investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that a North Carolina sheriff and his deputies discriminated against Latinos by making unwarranted arrests with the intent of maximizing deportations.

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Austin PD uses Panasonic system E-mail
Written by Richard Segovia and Michael Sheffield   

It was 0130 hours. A lonely black and white police car driven by a police officer was patrolling the north side of the City.  It was cold and wet. No calls all night and the shift was already half over. But them something caught his eye. The officer’s attention was drawn to a car pulling out of a vacant lot. He had never seen any motor vehicle activity at this particular location so his suspicions were raised. When he pulled behind the car he noticed a rear brake light was out and he decided to pull the driver, who looked like a young, college-age co-ed, over.

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Suspect that shot cop still on the loose E-mail
Written by APB Staff and Chino PD   

The Chino Police Department in California and police and the FBI in Salt Lake City are currently looking for a man who robbed an Idaho credit union and who authorities also believe may be responsible for other robberies in California and Washington. The suspect is known as the "AK-47 Bandit."

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Teaching exactly the wrong lesson E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

The problem with “zero tolerance” policies is that they frequently come with zero-intelligence. According to a recent article in The Daily Commercial newspaper in Florida, a high school student who stood up for a special needs classmate has been branded a bully by school officials.

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Everyone's got their own PD E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

According to a recent article in the Dayton Daily News, cops that don’t work in traditional city and county agencies are playing an increasing role in Ohio law enforcement. Law enforcement officers working outside of traditional agencies are seeing their numbers increase and are generally handling the law enforcement needs of entities like hospitals, colleges, airports and even a regional transit authority.

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Thanks for coming to the rescue- again E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

The recent super storm known as Sandy has devastated parts of the East Coast and taken roughly 100 lives. The Jersey Shore, Atlantic City, Staten Island, Long Island and scores of other communities in New York and New Jersey are still trying to get back to something like normal.

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Kasprzak- a Hero till the end E-mail
Written by Cynthia Brown   

The NYPD is in mourning after a hero cop died shortly after getting six members of his family out of harm's way during superstorm Sandy. Officer Artur Kasprzak, 28, was among the scores of  people killed in New York City as a result of the storm.

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PTSD cuts a career short E-mail
Written by Nathan Schlitz   

I recently retired from the Mesa Police Department due to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD.) I was hired by the City of Mesa in 1999, and had to leave the career I love in 2010. I worked eight years as a patrol officer and three years a gang detective. I had focused on gang investigation and enforcement, and being a gang detective was the ultimate dream position for me.

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Pitchess motions in administrative appeal hearings? E-mail
Written by Michael P. Stone and Muna Busailah of Stone Busailah, LLP   

For the very first time, the California Court of Appeal (“C.A.”) has ruled that so-called Pitchess motions can be brought in administrative appeal hearings in police discipline cases, to discover evidence of excessive or disproportionate (“disparate”) penalties, for the purpose of showing that others who committed substantially similar misconduct were not penalized to the same degree as the appellant. 

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Police History 101 E-mail
Written by James Redfearn   

An air of conflict and change pervaded Boston and the America of 1919. Four million WWI veterans returned to high unemployment, a poor economy, high cost-of-living and a conflicted and dispirited citizenry.

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$20 million settlement for Sergeants’ Union E-mail
Written by Robert Mladinich   

In April 2004 the NYC Sergeants Benevolent Association (SBA) filed a lawsuit against the City of New York on behalf 4,304 members under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).  The suit challenged the way in which the NYPD paid overtime to sergeants since 2001. The City asserted that the primary role of sergeants was managerial in nature, thereby precluding them from being entitled to overtime compensation.

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Bond holders coming for your pension E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

The pension killers seem to have decided that the battle for public opinion is already won. The sheer number of cops who backed Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker in his recall election earlier this year certainly backs that assertion up.
Now that the public relations war has been won, groups that oppose defined benefit plans for public sector employees have moved on to the courts. That’s where the real action is.

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Bomb school is a blast E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

If an NYPD bomb tech is going to make a mistake attempting to defuse a truck wired with 250 pounds of highly explosive fertilizer, he ought to make it here. The Hazardous Devices School, a 450-acre campus in Huntsville, Ala., jointly run by the Army and FBI, is where rookie “bomb techs” and old pros assigned to the NYPD’s 108-year-old bomb squad come to make the errors that might be deadly in real life.

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Doesn't pass the smell test E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

In what could turn out be a significant trend, a Florida judge has thrown out a criminal case based on his skepticism that a police officer can smell marijuana in another vehicle from a moving patrol car. Cops who attempt to make arrests or question suspects after saying they smelled marijuana while driving inside their patrol cars may find it an increasingly tough sell in court.

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Can we get a ruling here? E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

In the old days, it was easy to tell who was an actual cop and who wasn’t. These days it’s anyone’s guess. According to a recent article in the Chikasaw Journal, the Okolona Board of Mayor and Aldermen in Alabama will seek an Attorney General's opinion to determine if they have the power to say who can be a volunteer police officer.

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Apple thefts cause crime increase E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

According to NYPD Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, the slight uptick in Big Apple crime rates is largely due to the popularity of Apple products. According to a recent article posted on NBCNewYork.com, a 40 percent jump in theft of Apple products is the key factor in figuring out why crime rates in New York City have not declined this year as has been the case for the past several decades.

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Gang injunction pays off E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

According to an article in The Long Beach Post, Long Beach police officers, elected officials and prosecutors have filed a comprehensive gang injunction designed to target local violent street gangs with ties to the Mexican Mafia. Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster, Police Chief Jim McDonnell and City Prosecutor Doug Haubert described the initiative at a recent press conference.

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The horrific impact of sex crimes E-mail
Written by Linda O’Dochartaigh   

While media and collegiate officials debated how best to handle the Penn State child-rape scandal, including the systemic cover-up by university leaders, others want the public to know just how such abuse ruins lives.
“I’ve heard commentators say things like, ‘What’s done is done,’ or ‘There’s no one left to go after,’ or ‘Why punish the students and the athletes? – It’s time to heal,’ ” says child advocate Linda O’Dochartaigh, whose novel Peregrine  details the stark aftermath of child sex abuse.

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Jury awards victim $31.5 million E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

A jury awarded a catastrophically injured man and his wife more than $31.5 million recently in a ruling against Caltrans, finding the state agency responsible for a dangerous roadway condition on a section of California State Route 138. The accident occurred at the intersection of SR 138 and Mountain Road on April 29, 2009, causing severe brain and spinal cord injuries to David Evans, who will require 24-hour nursing care for the rest of his life.

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Private security boom times- courtesy of the taxpayer E-mail
Written by Mark Nichols   

One might think that with the billions upon billions of tax dollars spent over the last decade in order to “secure the homeland,” that suspicious devices are being taken very seriously and that sketchy foreign nationals are no longer training at flight schools. You know, like the 9/11 hijackers? Sadly that just doesn’t seem to be the case. A new report from the inspector general at the Department of Homeland Security rips the handling of an improvised explosive device found outside a federal building in Detroit in 2011.

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